Aruba Cryptocurrency Laws

Aruba and Cryptocurrency

Aruba Cryptocurrency Laws

Regulation of Digital Currencies: Cryptocurrency, Bitcoins, Blockchain Technology

Cryptocurrency within Aruba remains controversial, but blockchain technology appears to be of increasing focus.

A 2019 study of financial technology in Latin America indicated that Aruba currently lacks a specific comprehensive law providing a concrete regulatory framework for this technology.[1] At the same time, it indicated that private-sector digital currencies are allowed.[2]

Public Digital Currency Warnings

Notably, Aruban officials view cryptocurrency skeptically. According to the International Monetary Fund, Aruban officials have made public warnings about the potential risks of crypto-assets, including Bitcoin.[3] The primary focus of these warnings is to educate the general public about the difference between legal tender (issued by the Central bank or the State) and digital currencies issued by private firms.[4] Additionally, officials seek to notify the public that digital currencies are highly volatile and possibly subject to illegal activity.[5]

Despite the controversy surrounding cryptocurrency, Aruba increasingly looks toward the use of blockchain technology. Recently, for example, Aruba partnered with Indicio.tech and SITA to trial a distributed ledger technology (DLT) addressing the COVID-19 pandemic.[6] With the technology, Aruba would issue digital certificates to visitors testing negative for COVID-19, enabling these tourists to access shops, restaurants, and other attractions.[7]

Therefore, Aruba lacks a regulatory scheme that addresses cryptocurrency, and officials continue to view it skeptically. Despite this, the nation is looking to incorporate blockchain technology in other arenas.

Is cryptocurrency legal in Aruba?
Do you have questions about Aruba cryptocurrency, digital currencies, or blockchain technology? Freeman Law can help with digital currencies, tax planning, and tax compliance.   Contact us now or Schedule a consultation or call (214) 984-3410 to discuss your cryptocurrency and blockchain technology concerns.


[1] Table 1, Fintech in Latin America and the Caribbean: Stocktaking, International Monetary Fund (March 2019), https://www.imf.org/en/Publications/WP/Issues/2019/03/26/Fintech-in-Latin-America-and-the-Caribbean-Stocktaking-46677.

[2] Table 1, Fintech in Latin America and the Caribbean: Stocktaking, International Monetary Fund (March 2019), https://www.imf.org/en/Publications/WP/Issues/2019/03/26/Fintech-in-Latin-America-and-the-Caribbean-Stocktaking-46677.

[3] Fintech: The Experience So Far, International Monetary Fund (June 2019), https://www.imf.org/en/Publications/Policy-Papers/Issues/2019/06/27/Fintech-The-Experience-So-Far-47056.

[4] Fintech in Latin America and the Caribbean: Stocktaking, International Monetary Fund (March 2019), https://www.imf.org/en/Publications/WP/Issues/2019/03/26/Fintech-in-Latin-America-and-the-Caribbean-Stocktaking-46677.

[5] Fintech in Latin America and the Caribbean: Stocktaking, International Monetary Fund (March 2019), https://www.imf.org/en/Publications/WP/Issues/2019/03/26/Fintech-in-Latin-America-and-the-Caribbean-Stocktaking-46677.

[6] https://coinmarketcap.com/headlines/news/caribbean-island-blockchain-covid-19-health-credential-system/

[7] https://coinmarketcap.com/headlines/news/caribbean-island-blockchain-covid-19-health-credential-system/